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First commit containing CP/M 3 help files

This commit is contained in:
acn 2020-03-18 11:54:31 +01:00
parent 21718e3c0b
commit 20d9a123cb
36 changed files with 2178 additions and 32 deletions

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# ---> C
# Object files
*.o
*.ko
*.obj
*.elf
# Precompiled Headers
*.gch
*.pch
# Libraries
*.lib
*.a
*.la
*.lo
# Shared objects (inc. Windows DLLs)
*.dll
*.so
*.so.*
*.dylib
# Executables
*.exe
*.out
*.app
*.i*86
*.x86_64
*.hex
# Debug files
*.dSYM/
makehelp
*.raw

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# Also: help.raw => 0:HELP.DAT, "HELP [C]", to re-create HELP.HLP if 'makehelp'
# doesn't produce a working HELP.HLP file.
#
# Paragraphs may be justified using "par j".
HELPS = \
cpm3/*.help \
romwbw/*.help
all: makehelp help.hlp
help.hlp: $(HELPS)
cat $^ | unix2dos >help.raw
./makehelp help.raw >$@
@rm help.raw
makehelp: src/makehelp.c
$(CC) -o $@ $^
clean:
$(RM) help.hlp help.raw makehelp

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///1commands
CP/M 3 Command Format:
A>COMMAND {command tail} <cr>
A CP/M 3 command line is composed of a command, an optional
command tail, and a carriage return. The command is the name or
filename of a program to be executed. The optional command tail
can consist of a drive specification, one or more file
specifications, and some options or parameters.
///2conventions
COMMAND CONVENTIONS
The following special symbols define command syntax.
{} surrounds an optional item.
| separates alternative items in a command line.
<cr> indicates a carriage return.
^ indicates the Control Key.
n substitute a number for n.
s substitute a string (group) of characters for s.
o substitute an option or option list for o.
[] type square brackets to enclose an option list.
() type parens to enclose a range of options within an option list.
RW Read-Write attribute - opposite of RO
RO Read-Only attribute - opposite of RW
SYS System attribute - opposite of DIR
DIR Directory attribute - opposite of SYS
... preceding element can be repeated as many times as desired.
* wildcard: replaces all or part of a filename and/or filetype.
? wildcard: replaces any single character
in the same position of a filename and/or filetype.

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///1cntrlchars
Control Character Function
CTRL-A moves cursor one character to the left. Banked system
only.
CTRL-B moves cursor from beginning to end of command line and
back without affecting command. Banked system only.
CTRL-C stops executing program when entered at the system
prompt or after CTRL-S.
CTRL-E forces a physical carriage return without sending
command to CP/M 3.
CTRL-F moves cursor one character to the right. Banked system
only.
CTRL-G deletes character at current cursor position if in the
middle of a line. Banked system only.
CTRL-I same as the TAB key.
CTRL-H delete character to the left of cursor.
CTRL-J moves cursor to the left of the command line and sends
command to CP/M 3. Line feed, has same effect as
carriage return.
CTRL-K deletes character at cursor and all characters to the
right.
CTRL-M same as carriage return.
CTRL-P echoes console output to the list device.
CTRL-Q restarts screen scrolling after a CTRL-S.
CTRL-R retypes the characters to the left of the cursor on a
new line; updates the command line buffer.
CTRL-S stops screen scrolling.
CTRL-U updates the command line buffer to contain the
characters to the left of the cursor; deletes current
line.
CTRL-W recalls previous command line if current line is empty;
otherwise moves cursor to end of line. CTRL-J,-M,-R,-U
and RETURN update the command line buffer for recall
with CTRL-W. Banked system only.
CTRL-X deletes all characters to the left of the cursor.

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///1COPYSYS
Syntax:
COPYSYS {d:{filename}} {d:} {[options]}
Explanation:
COPYSYS copies the CP/M 3 system from a CP/M 3 system disk or file to
another disk. The new disk must have the same format as the original
system disk. Filename must refer to a LDRxxx.COM image created by
linking appropriate loader modules. Multiple options are separated by
commas, enclosed in brackets. Options are:
S = Use current dest drive modes
NS = Ignore current drive modes
NC = Do not copy CCP.COM or CPM3.SYS
NE = Do not force mode validity
Mode Changes:
DS or SS = double or single sided
DT or ST = double (96 tpi) or single (48 tpi) track
DD or SD = double or single density
Boot Drive:
## = Set boot drive (physical drive number)
Mode changes must be compatible with drive and match media on
destination. The S option may not be used with mode changes. CPM3.SYS
will not be copied if filename was specified.
If drives are not specified, they will be prompted for.
This utility has been extended by Magnolia Microsystems.
Examples:
A>COPYSYS A:LDRZ37.COM B: [DS,DD]
A>COPYSYS

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///1DATE
Syntax:
DATE {CONTINUOUS}
DATE {time-specification}
DATE SET
Explanation:
The DATE command lets you display and set the date and time of
day.
///2Examples
A>DATE
Displays the current date and time.
A>DATE C
Displays the date and time continuously.
A>DATE 08/14/82 10:30:0
Sets the date and time.
A>DATE SET
Prompts for date and time entries.

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///1DEVICE
Syntax:
DEVICE { NAMES | VALUES | physical-dev | logical-dev}
DEVICE logical-dev=physical-dev {option}
{,physical-dev {option},...}
DEVICE logical-dev = NULL
DEVICE physical-dev {option}
DEVICE CONSOLE [ PAGE | COLUMNS = columns | LINES = lines]
Explanation:
DEVICE displays current logical device assignments and physical
device names. DEVICE assigns logical devices to peripheral
devices attached to the computer. DEVICE also sets the
communications protocol and speed of a peripheral device, and
displays or sets the current console screen size.
///2Options
[ XON | NOXON | baud-rate ]
XON refers to the XON/XOFF communications protocol.
NOXON indicates no protocol and the computer sends data to
the device whether or not the device is ready to
receive it.
baud-rate is the speed of the device. The system
accepts the following baud rates:
50 75 110 134
150 300 600 1200
1800 2400 3600 4800
7200 9600 19200
///2Examples
A>DEVICE
Displays the physical devices and current assignments of
the logical devices in the system.
A>DEVICE NAMES
Lists the physical devices with a summary of the device
characteristics.
A>DEVICE VALUES
Displays the current logical device assignments.
A>DEVICE CRT
Displays the attributes of the physical device CRT.
A>DEVICE CON
Displays the assignment of the logical device CON:
A>DEVICE CONOUT:=LPT,CRT
Assigns the system console output (CONOUT:) to the
printer (LPT) and the screen (CRT).
A>DEVICE AUXIN:=CRT2 [XON,9600]
Assigns the auxiliary logical input device (AUXIN:) to
the physical device CRT using protocol XON/XOFF and
sets the transmission rate for the device at 9600.
A>DEVICE LST:=NULL
Disconnects the list output logical device (LST:).
A>DEVICE LPT [XON,9600]
Sets the XON/XOFF protocol for the physical device LPT
and sets the transmission speed at 9600.
A>DEVICE CONSOLE [PAGE]
Displays the current console page width in columns and
length in lines.
A>DEVICE CONSOLE [COLUMNS=40 LINES=16]
Sets the screen size to 40 columns and 16 lines.

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///1DIR
The DIR command displays the names of files and the
characteristics associated with the files.
The DIR command has three distinct references:
DIR
DIRS
DIR with Options
DIR and DIRS are built-in utilities. DIR with Options is a
transient utility and must be loaded into memory from the disk.
///2Built-in
Syntax:
DIR {d:}
DIR {filespec}
DIRS {d:}
DIRS {filespec}
Explanation:
The DIR and DIRS Built-in commands display the names of files
cataloged in the directory of an on-line disk. DIR lists the
names of files in the current user number that have the Directory
(DIR) attribute. DIR accepts the * and ? wildcards in the file
specification.
///3Examples
A>DIR
Displays all files in user 0 on drive A that have the
Directory attribute.
A>DIR B:
Displays all DIR files in user 0 on drive B.
2A>DIR C:ZIPPY.DAT
Displays the name ZIPPY.DAT if the file is in user 2 on
drive C.
4A>DIR *.BAS
Displays all DIR files with filetype BAS in user 4 on drive
A.
B3>DIR X*.C?D
Displays all DIR files in user 3 on drive B whose filename
begins with the letter X, and whose three character filetype
contains the first character C and last character D.
A>DIRS
Displays all files for user 0 on drive A that have the
system (SYS) attribute.
A>DIRS *.COM
Displays all SYS files with filetype COM on drive A in user
0. A command (.COM) file in user 0 with the system
attribute can be accessed from any user number on that
drive, and from any drive in the search chain (see SETDEF).
///2withOptions
Syntax:
DIR {d:} [options]
DIR {filespec} {filespec} ... [options]
Explanation:
The DIR command with options is an enhanced version of the DIR
built-in command and displays your files in a variety of ways.
DIR can search for files on any or all drives, for any or all
user numbers. One or two letters is sufficient to identify an
option. You need not type the right hand square bracket.
///3Options
Option Function
ATT displays the file attributes.
DATE displays date and time stamps of files.
DIR displays only files that have the DIR attribute.
DRIVE=ALL displays files on all on-line drives.
DRIVE=(A,B,C,...,P)
displays files on the drives specified.
DRIVE=d displays files on the drive specified by d.
EXCLUDE displays files that DO NOT MATCH the files
specified in the command line.
FF sends an initial form feed to the printer device if
the printer has been activated by CTRL-P.
FULL shows the name, size, number of 128-byte records, and
attributes of the files. If there is a directory
label on the drive, DIR shows the password
protection mode and the time stamps. If there is no
directory label, DIR displays two file entries on a
line, omitting the password and time stamp columns.
The display is alphabetically sorted. (See SET for a
description of file attributes, directory labels,
passwords and protection modes.)
LENGTH=n displays n lines of printer output before inserting
a table heading. n is a number between 5 and 65536.
MESSAGE displays the names of drives and user numbers DIR is
searching.
NOSORT displays files in the order it finds them on the disk.
RO displays only the files that have the Read-Only
attribute.
RW displays only the files that are set to Read-Write.
SIZE displays the filename and size in kilobytes (1024
bytes).
SYS displays only the files that have the SYS attribute.
USER=ALL displays all files in all user numbers for the default
or specified drive.
USER=n displays the files in the user number specified by n.
USER=(0,1,...,15)
displays files under the user numbers specified.
///3Examples
A>DIR C: [FULL]
Displays full set of characteristics for all files in user 0
on drive C.
A>DIR C: [DATE]
Lists the files on drive C and their dates.
A>DIR D: [RW,SYS]
Displays all files in user 0 on drive D with Read-Write
and System attributes.
3A>DIR [USER=ALL, DRIVE=ALL]
Displays all the files in all user numbers (0-15) in all on-
line drives.
B6>DIR [exclude] *.DAT
Lists all the files on drive B in user 6 that do not have a
filetype of .DAT.
3B>DIR [SIZE] *.PLI *.COM *.ASM
Displays all the files of type PLI, COM, and ASM in user
3 on drive B in size display format.
A>DIR [drive=all user=all] TESTFILE.BOB
DIR displays the filename TESTFILE.BOB if it is found on
any drive in any user number.
A>DIR [size,rw] D:
DIR lists each Read-Write file that resides on Drive D,
with its size in kilobytes. Note that D: is equivalent to
D:*.*.

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///1DUMP
Syntax:
DUMP filespec
Explanation:
DUMP displays the contents of a file in hexadecimal and ASCII
format.
Example:
A>DUMP ABC.TEX

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///1ed
Format:
ED input-filespec {d:|output-filespec}
Explanation:
Character file editor. To redirect or rename the new version of
the file specify the destination drive or destination filespec.
///2commands
ED Command Summary
Command Action
nA
append n lines from original file to memory buffer
0A
append file until buffer is one half full
#A
append file until buffer is full (or end of file)
B, -B
move CP to the beginning (B) or bottom (-B) of buffer
nC, -nC
move CP n characters forward (C) or back (-C) through buffer
nD, -nD
delete n characters before (-D) or from (D) the CP
E
save new file and return to CP/M-86
Fstring{^Z}
find character string
H
save new file, reedit, use new file as original file
I<cr>
enter insert mode
Istring{^Z}
insert string at CP
Jsearch_str^Zins_str^Zdel_to_str
juxtapose strings
nK, -nK
delete (kill) n lines from the CP
nL, -nL, 0L
move CP n lines
nMcommands
execute commands n times
n, -n
move CP n lines and display that line
n:
move to line n
:ncommand
execute command through line n
Nstring{^Z}
extended find string
O
return to original file
nP, -nP
move CP 23 lines forward and display 23 lines at console
Q
abandon new file, return to CP/M-86
R{^Z}
read X$$$$$$$.LIB file into buffer
Rfilespec{^Z}
read filespec into buffer
Sdelete string^Zinsert string
substitute string
nT, -nT, 0T
type n lines
U, -U
upper-case translation
V, -V
line numbering on/off
0V
display free buffer space
nW
write n lines to new file
0W
write until buffer is half empty
nX
write or append n lines to X$$$$$$$.LIB
nXfilespec{^Z}
write n lines to filespec;
append if previous xcommand applied to same file
0x{^Z}
delete file X$$$$$$$.LIB
0xfilespec{^Z}
delete filespec
nZ
wait n seconds
Note: CP points to the current character being referenced in
the edit buffer. Use {^Z} to separate multiple commands
on the same line.
///2Examples
A>ED TEST.DAT
A>ED TEST.DAT B:
A>ED TEST.DAT TEST2.DAT
A>ED TEST.DAT B:TEST2.DAT

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///1erase
Syntax:
ERASE {filespec} {[CONFIRM]}
Explanation:
The ERASE command removes one or more files from the
directory of a disk. Wildcard characters are accepted in the
filespec. Directory and data space are automatically reclaimed
for later use by another file. The ERASE command can be
abbreviated to ERA.
///2Option
[CONFIRM] option informs the system to prompt for
verification before erasing each file that
matches the filespec. CONFIRM can be
abbreviated to C.
///2Examples
A>ERASE X.PAS
Removes the file X.PAS from the disk in drive A.
A>ERA *.PRN
Confirm (Y/N)?Y
All files with the filetype PRN are removed from the disk
in drive A.
B>ERA A:MY*.* [CONFIRM]
Each file on drive A with a filename that begins with MY is
displayed with a question mark for confirmation. Type Y to
erase the file displayed, N to keep the file.
A>ERA B:*.*
Confirm (Y/N)?Y
All files on drive B are removed from the disk.

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///1filespec
FILESPEC FORMAT
CP/M 3 identifies every file by its unique file specification,
which can consist of four parts: the drive specification, the
filename, the filetype and the password. The term "filespec"
indicates any valid combination of the four parts of a file
specification, all separated by their appropriate delimiters.
A colon must follow a drive letter. A period must precede a
filetype. A semicolon must precede a password.
The symbols and rules for the parts of a file
specification follow:
d: drivespec optional single alpha character (A-P)
filename filename 1-8 letters and/or numbers
typ filetype optional 0-3 letters and/or numbers
password password optional 0-8 letters and/or numbers
Valid combinations of the elements of a CP/M 3 file specification
are:
filename
d:filename
filename.typ
d:filename.typ
filename;password
d:filename;password
filename.typ;password
d:filename.typ;password
If you do not include a drive specifier, CP/M 3 automatically
uses the default drive.
Some CP/M 3 commands accept wildcard (* and ?) characters in the
filename and/or filetype parts of the command tail. A wildcard
in the command line can in one command reference many matching
files on the default or specified user number and drive. (See
Commands).

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///1GENCOM
Syntax:
GENCOM {COM-filespec} {RSX-filespec} ...
{[LOADER | NULL | SCB=(offset,value)]}
Explanation:
The GENCOM command creates a special COM file with attached RSX
files. The GENCOM command can also restore a previously
GENCOMed file to the original COM file without the header and
RSX's. GENCOM can also attach header records to COM files.
///2Options
LOADER sets a flag to keep the program loader active.
NULL indicates that only RSX files are specified. GENCOM
creates a dummy COM file for the RSX files. The
output COM filename is taken from the filename of the
first RSX-filespec.
SCB=(offset,value)
sets the System Control Block from the program by
using the hex values specified by (offset,value).
///2Examples
A>GENCOM MYPROG PROG1 PROG2
Generates a new COM file MYPROG.COM with attached RSX's
PROG1 and PROG2.
A>GENCOM PROG1 PROG2 [NULL]
Creates a COM file PROG1.COM with RSX's PROG1 and PROG2.
A>GENCOM MYPROG
GENCOM takes MYPROG.COM, strips off the header and
deletes all attached RSX's to restore it to its original COM
format.
A>GENCOM MYPROG PROG1 PROG2
GENCOM looks at the already-GENCOMed file MYPROG.COM to see
if PROG1.RSX and PROG2.RSX are already attached RSX files in
the module. If either one is already attached, GENCOM
replaces it with the new RSX module. Otherwise, GENCOM
appends the specified RSX files to the COM file.

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///1GET
Syntax:
GET {CONSOLE INPUT FROM} FILE filespec{[{ECHO|NO ECHO} | SYSTEM]}
GET {CONSOLE INPUT FROM} CONSOLE
Explanation:
GET directs the system to take console input from a file for the
next system command or user program entered at the console.
Console input is taken from a file until the program
terminates. If the file is exhausted before program input is
terminated, the program looks for subsequent input from the
console. If the program terminates before exhausting all its
input, the system reverts back to the console for console input.
With the SYSTEM option, the system immediately goes to the
specified file for console input. The system reverts to the
console for input when it reaches the end of file. Re-direct
the system to the console for console input with the GET
CONSOLE INPUT FROM CONSOLE command as a command line in the input
file.
///2Options
ECHO specifies that input is echoed to the console. This
is the default option.
NO ECHO specifies that file input is not echoed to the
console. The program output and the system prompts are
not affected by this option and are still echoed to
the console.
SYSTEM specifies that all system input is immediately taken
from the disk file specified in the command line. GET
takes system and program input from the file until the
file is exhausted or until GET reads a GET console
command from the file.
///2Examples
A>GET FILE XINPUT
A>MYPROG
Tells the system to activate the GET utility. Since SYSTEM
is not specified, the system reads the next input line from
the console and executes MYPROG. If MYPROG program
requires console input, it is taken from the file XINPUT.
When MYPROG terminates, the system reverts back to the
console for console input.
A>GET FILE XIN2 [SYSTEM]
Immediately directs the system to get subsequent
console input from file XIN2 because it includes the SYSTEM
option. The system reverts back to the console for
console input when it reaches the end of file in XIN2. Or
XIN2 may redirect the system back to the console if it
contains a GET CONSOLE command.
A>GET CONSOLE
Tells the system to get console input from the console.
This command may be used in a file (previously specified in
a GET FILE command), which is already being read by the
system for console input. It is used to re-direct the
console input back to the console before the end-of-file
is reached.

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///1HELP
Syntax:
HELP {topic} {subtopic1 ... subtopic8} {[NOPAGE|LIST]}
Explanation:
HELP displays a list of topics and provides summarized
information for CP/M 3 commands.
HELP topic displays information about that topic.
HELP topic subtopic displays information about that subtopic.
One or two letters is enough to identify the topics. After HELP
displays information for your topic, it displays the
special prompt HELP> on your screen, followed by a list of
subtopics.
- Enter ? to display list of main topics.
- Enter a period and subtopic name to access subtopics.
- Enter a period to redisplay what you just read.
- Press the RETURN key to return to the CP/M 3 system prompt.
- [NOPAGE] option disables the 24 lines per page console display.
- Press any key to exit a display and return to the HELP> prompt.
Examples:
A>HELP
A>HELP DATE
A>HELP DIR OPTIONS
A>HELP>.OPTIONS
HELP>SET
HELP>SET PASSWORD
HELP>.PASSWORD
HELP>.
HELP><cr>

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///1HEXCOM
Syntax:
HEXCOM filename
Explanation:
The HEXCOM Command generates a command file (filetype .COM) from
a .HEX input file. It names the output file with the same
filename as the input file but with filetype .COM. HEXCOM always
looks for a file with filetype .HEX.
Example:
A>HEXCOM B:PROGRAM
Generates a command file PROGRAM.COM from the input hex file
PROGRAM.HEX.

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///1INITDIR
Syntax:
INITDIR {d:}
Explanation:
The INITDIR Command initializes a disk directory to allow date
and time stamping of files on that disk. INITDIR can also recover
time/date directory space.
Example:
A>INITDIR C:
INITDIR WILL ACTIVATE TIME-STAMPS FOR SPECIFIED DRIVE.
Do you want to re-format the directory on C: (Y/N)?Y

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///1LIB
Syntax:
LIB filespec{[I|M|P|D]}
LIB filespec{[I|M|P]}=filespec{modifier}
{,filespec{modifier} ... }
Explanation:
A library is a file that contains a collection of object modules.
Use the LIB utility to create libraries, and to append, replace,
select or delete modules from an existing library. Use LIB to
obtain information about the contents of library files.
LIB creates and maintains library files that contain object
modules in Microsoft REL file format. These modules are produced
by Digital Research's relocatable macro-assembler program, RMAC,
or any other language translator that pruduces modules in
Microsoft REL file format.
You can use LINK-80 to link the object modules contained in a
library to other object files. LINK-80 automatically selects
from the library only those modules needed by the program being
linked, and then forms an executable file with a filetype of COM.
///2Options
I The INDEX option creates an indexed library file
of type .IRL. LINK-80 searches faster on indexed
libraries than on non-indexed libraries.
M The MODULE option displays module names.
P The PUBLICS option displays module names and the
public variables for the new library file.
D The DUMP option displays the contents of object
modules in ASCII form.
///2Modifiers
Use modifiers in the command line to instruct LIB to
delete, replace, or select modules in a library file. Angle
brackets enclose the modules to be deleted or replaced.
Parentheses enclose the modules to be selected.
LIB Modifiers
Delete <module=>
Replace <module=filename.REL>
If module name and filename are the
same this shorthand can be used:
<filename>
Select (modFIRST-modLAST,mod1,mod2,...,modN)
///2Examples
A>LIB TEST4[P]
Displays all modules and publics in TEST4.REL.
A>LIB TEST5[P]=FILE1,FILE2
Creates TEST5.REL from FILE1.REL and FILE2.REL and displays
all modules and publics in TEST5.REL.
A>LIB TEST=TEST1(MOD1,MOD4),TEST2(C1-C4,C6)
Creates a library file TEST.REL from modules in two source
files. TEST1.REL contributes MOD1 and MOD4. LIB extracts
modules C1, C4, and all the modules located between them,
as well as module C6 from TEST2.REL.
A>LIB FILE2=FILE3<MODA=>
Creates FILE2.REL from FILE3.REL, omitting MODA which is
a module in FILE3.REL.
A>LIB FILE6=FILE5<MODA=FILEB.REL>
Creates FILE6.REL from FILE5.REL, FILEB.REL replaces MODA.
A>LIB FILE6=FILE5<THISNAME>
Module THISNAME is in FILE5.REL. When LIB creates
FILE6.REL from FILE5.REL the file THISNAME.REL replaces the
similarly named module THISNAME.
A>LIB FILE1[I]=B:FILE2(PLOTS,FIND,SEARCH-DISPLAY)
Creates FILE1.IRL on drive A from the selected modules
PLOTS, FIND, and modules SEARCH through the module
DISPLAY, in FILE2.REL on drive B.

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///1LINK
Syntax:
LINK d:{filespec,{[options]}=}filespec{[options]}{,...}
Explanation:
LINK combines relocatable object modules such as those
produced by RMAC and PL/I-80 into a .COM file ready for
execution. Relocatable files can contain external references and
publics. Relocatable files can reference modules in library
files. LINK searches the library files and includes the
referenced modules in the output file. See the CP/M 3
Programmer's Utilities Guide for a complete description of LINK-
80.
///2Options
Use LINK option switches to control execution parameters. Link
options follow the file specifications and are enclosed
within square brackets. Multiple switches are separated by
commas.
LINK-80 Options
A Additional memory; reduces buffer space
and writes temporary data to disk
B BIOS link in banked CP/M 3 system.
1. Aligns data segment on page boundary.
2. Puts length of code segment in header.
3. Defaults to .SPR filetype.
Dhhhh Data origin; sets memory origin for
common and data area
Gn Go; set start address to label n
Lhhhh Load; change default load address
of module to hhhh. Default 0100H
Mhhhh Memory size; Define free memory
requirements for MP/M modules.
NL No listing of symbol table at console
NR No symbol table file
OC Output .COM command file. Default
OP Output .PRL page relocatable file for
execution under MP/M in relocatable
segment
OR Output .RSP resident system process file
for execution under MP/M
OS Output .SPR system page relocatable file
for execution under MP/M
Phhhh Program origin; changes default
program origin address to hhhh.
Default is 0100H.
Q Lists symbols with leading question mark
S Search preceding file as a library
$Cd Destination of console messages
d can be X (console), Y (printer),
or Z (zero output). Default is X.
$Id Source of intermediate files;
d is disk drive A-P. Default
is current drive.
$Ld Source of library files;
d is disk drive A-P. Default
is current drive.
$Od Destination of of object file;
d can be Z or disk drive A-P.
Default is to same drive as
first file in the LINK-80 command.
$Sd Destination of symbol file;
d can be Y or Z or disk drive A-P.
Default is to same drive as
first file in LINK-80 command.
///2Examples
A>LINK b:MYFILE[NR]
LINK-80 on drive A uses as input MYFILE.REL on drive B and
produces the executable machine code file MYFILE.COM on
drive B. The [NR] option specifies no symbol table file.
A>LINK m1,m2,m3
LINK-80 combines the separately compiled files m1, m2, and
m3, resolves their external references, and produces the
executable machine code file m1.COM.
A>LINK m=m1,m2,m3
LINK-80 combines the separately compiled files m1, m2, and
m3 and produces the executable machine code file m.COM.
A>LINK MYFILE,FILE5[s]
The [s] option tells LINK-80 to search FILE5 as a library.
LINK-80 combines MYFILE.REL with the referenced
subroutines contained in FILE5.REL on the default drive
A and produces MYFILE.COM on drive A.

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///1mac
Syntax:
MAC filename {$options}
Explanation:
MAC, the CP/M 3 macro assembler, reads assembly language
statements from a file of type .ASM, assembles the statements,
and produces three output files with the input filename and
filetypes of .HEX, .PRN, and .SYM. Filename.HEX contains INTEL
hexadecimal format object code. Filename.PRN contains an
annotated source listing that you can print or examine at the
console. Filename.SYM contains a sorted list of symbols defined
in the program.
///2Examples
A>MAC SAMPLE
A>MAC SAMPLE $PB AA HB SX
///2options
Use options to direct the input and output of MAC. Use a letter
with the option to indicate the source and destination drives,
and console, printer, or zero output. Valid drive names are A
thru O. X, P and Z specify console, printer, and zero output,
respectively.
Assembly Options That Direct Input/Output
A source drive for .ASM file (A-O)
H destination drive for .HEX file (A-O, Z)
L source drive for macrolibrary .LIB files called by the
MACLIB statement.
P destination drive for .PRN file (A-O, X, P, Z)
S destination drive for .SYM file
Assembly Options That Modify Contents Of Output File
+L lists input lines read from macrollibrary .LIB files
-L suppresses listing (default)
+M lists all macro lines as they are processed during assembly
-M suppresses all macro lines as they are read during assembly
*M lists only hex generated by macro expansions
+Q lists all LOCAL symbols in the symbol list
-Q suppresses all LOCAL symbols in the symbol list (default)
+S appends symbol file to print file
-S suppresses creation of symbol file
+1 produces a pass 1 listing for macro debugging in .PRN file
-1 suppress listing on pass 1 (default)

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///1PATCH
Syntax:
PATCH filename{.typ} {n}
Explanation:
The PATCH command displays or installs patch number n to the
CP/M 3 system or command files. The patch number n must be
between 1 and 32 inclusive.
Example:
A>PATCH SHOW 2
Patches the SHOW.COM system file with patch number 2.

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///1PIP (copy)
Syntax:
DESTINATION SOURCE
PIP d:{Gn} | filespec{[Gn]} = filespec{[o]},... | d:{[o]}
Explanation:
The file copy program PIP copies files, combines files, and
transfers files between disks, printers, consoles, or other
devices attached to your computer. The first filespec is the
destination. The second filespec is the source. Use two or more
source filespecs separated by commas to combine two or more files
into one file. [o] is any combination of the available options.
The [Gn] option in the destination filespec tells PIP to copy
your file to that user number.
PIP with no command tail displays an * prompt and awaits your
series of commands, entered and processed one line at a time.
The source or destination can be any CP/M 3 logical device.
///2Examples
COPY A FILE FROM ONE DISK TO ANOTHER
A>PIP b:=a:draft.txt
A>PIP b:draft.txt = a:
B3>PIP myfile.dat=A:[G9]
A9>PIP B:[G3]=myfile.dat
COPY A FILE AND RENAME IT
A5>PIP newdraft.txt=oldraft.txt
C8>PIP b:newdraft.txt=a:oldraft.txt
COPY MULTIPLE FILES
A>PIP b:=draft.*
A>PIP b:=*.*
B>PIP b:=c:.*.*
C>PIP b:=*.txt[g5]
C>PIP a:=*.com[wr]
B>PIP a:[g3]=c:*.*
COMBINE MULTIPLE FILES
A>PIP b:new.dat=file1.dat,file2.dat
COPY, RENAME AND PLACE IN USER 1
A>pip newdraft.txt[g1]=oldraft.txt
COPY, RENAME AND GET FROM USER 1
A>PIP newdraft.txt=oldraft.txt[g1]
COPY TO/FROM LOGICAL DEVICES
A>PIP b:funfile.sue=con:
A>PIP lst:=con:
A>PIP lst:=b:draft.txt[t8]
A>PIP prn:=b:draft.txt
///2options
PIP OPTIONS
A Archive. Copy only files that have been changed since the
last copy.
C Confirm. PIP prompts for confirmation before each file copy.
Dn Delete any characters past column n.
E Echo transfer to console.
F Filter form-feeds from source data.
Gn Get from or go to user n.
H Test for valid Hex format.
I Ignore :00 Hex data records and test for valid Hex format.
K Kill display of filespecs on console.
L Translate upper case to lower case.
N Number output lines
O Object file transfer, ^Z ignored.
Pn Set page length to n. (default n=60)
Qs^Z Quit copying from source at string s.
R Read files that have been set to SYStem.
Ss^Z Start copying from the source at the string s.
Tn Expand tabs to n spaces.
U Translate lower case to upper case.
V Verify that data has been written correctly.
W Write over Read Only files without console query.
Z Zero the parity bit.
All options except C,G,K,O,R,V and W force an ASCII file
transfer, character by character, terminated by a ^Z.

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///1PUT
Syntax:
PUT CONSOLE {OUTPUT TO} FILE filespec {option} | CONSOLE
PUT PRINTER {OUTPUT TO} FILE filespec {option} | PRINTER
PUT CONSOLE {OUTPUT TO} CONSOLE
PUT PRINTER {OUTPUT TO} PRINTER
Explanation:
PUT puts console or printer output to a file for the next
command entered at the console, until the program terminates.
Then console output reverts to the console. Printer output
is directed to a file until the program terminates.
Then printer output is put back to the printer.
PUT with the SYSTEM option directs all subsequent
console/printer output to the specified file. This option
terminates when you enter the PUT CONSOLE or PUT PRINTER
command.
///2Options
[ {ECHO | NO ECHO} {FILTER | NO FILTER} | {SYSTEM} ]
ECHO specifies that output is echoed to the console. This
is the default option when you direct console output
to a file.
NO ECHO specifies that file output is not echoed to the
console. NO ECHO is the default for the PUT PRINTER
command.
FILTER specifies filtering of control characters, which
means that control characters are translated to
printable characters. For example, an ESCape
character is translated to ^[.
NO FILTER means that PUT does not translate control
characters. This is the default option.
SYSTEM specifies that system output as well as program
output is written to the file specified by
filespec. Output is written to the file until a
subsequent PUT CONSOLE command redirects console
output back to the console.
///2Examples
A>PUT CONSOLE OUTPUT TO FILE XOUT [ECHO]
Directs console output to file XOUT with the output echoed
to the console.
A>PUT PRINTER OUTPUT TO FILE XOUT
A>MYPROG
Directs the printer output of program MYPROG to file
XOUT. The output is not echoed to the printer.
A>PUT PRINTER OUTPUT TO FILE XOUT2 [ECHO,SYSTEM]
Directs all printer output to file XOUT2 as well as to the
printer (with ECHO option), and the PUT is in effect until
you enter a PUT PRINTER OUTPUT TO PRINTER command.
A>PUT CONSOLE OUTPUT TO CONSOLE
Directs console output back to the console.
A>PUT PRINTER OUTPUT TO PRINTER
Directs printer output back to the printer.

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///1RENAME
Syntax:
RENAME {new-filespec=old-filespec}
Explanation:
RENAME lets you change the name of a file in the directory of a
disk. To change several filenames in one command use the * or ?
wildcards in the file specifications. The RENAME command can be
abbreviated REN. REN prompts you for input.
///2Examples
A>RENAME NEWFILE.BAS=OLDFILE.BAS
The file OLDFILE.BAS changes to NEWFILE.BAS on drive A.
A>RENAME
The system prompts for the filespecs:
Enter New Name:X.PRN
Enter Old Name:Y.PRN
Y .PRN=X .PRN
A>
File X.PRN is renamed to Y.PRN on drive A.
B>REN A:PRINTS.NEW = PRINCE.NEW
The file PRINCE.NEW on drive A changes to PRINTS.NEW on
drive A.
A>RENAME S*.TEX=A*.TEX
The above command renames all the files matching
A*.TEX to files with filenames S*.TEX.
A>REN B:NEWLIST=B:OLDLIST
The file OLDLIST changes to NEWLIST on drive B. Since the
second drive specifier, B: is implied by the first one, it
is unnecessary in this example. The command line above has
the same effect as the following:
A>REN B:NEWLIST=OLDLIST
or
A>REN NEWLIST=B:OLDLIST

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///1RMAC
Syntax:
RMAC filespec {$Rd | $Sd | $Pd}
Explanation:
RMAC, a relocatable macro assembler, assembles .ASM files of
into .REL files that you can link to create .COM files.
///2options
RMAC options specify the destination of the output files.
Replace d with the destination drive letter for the output files.
Option d=output option
R- drive for REL file (A-O, Z)
S- drive for SYM file (A-O, X, P, Z)
P- drive for PRN file (A-O, X, P, Z)
A-O specifies drive A-O.
X means output to the console.
P means output to the printer.
Z means zero output.
///2Example
A>RMAC TEST $PX SB RB
Assembles the file TEST.ASM from drive A, sends the listing
file (TEST.PRN) to the console, puts the symbol file
(TEST.SYM) on drive B and puts the relocatable object
file (TEST.REL) on drive B.

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///1SAVE
Syntax:
SAVE
Explanation:
SAVE copies the contents of memory to a file. To use SAVE,
first issue the SAVE command, then run your program which reads a
file into memory. Your program exits to the SAVE utility which
prompts you for a filespec to which it copies the contents of
memory, and the beginning and ending address of the memory to be
SAVEd.
///2Example
A>SAVE
Activates the SAVE utility. Now enter the name of the program
which loads a file into memory.
A>SID dump.com
Next, execute the program.
#g0
When the program exits, SAVE intercepts the return to the system
and prompts the user for the filespec and the bounds of memory to
be SAVEd.
SAVE Ver 3.0
Enter file (type RETURN to exit):dump2.com
If file DUMP2.COM exists already, the system asks:
Delete dump2.com? Y
Then the system asks for the bounds of memory to be saved:
Beginning hex address: 100
Ending hex address: 400
The contents of memory from 100H (Hexadecimal) to 400H is copied
to file DUMP2.COM.

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///1SET
Syntax:
SET [options]
SET d: [options]
SET filespec [options]
Explanation:
SET initiates password protection and time stamping of
files. It also sets the file and drive attributes Read-Write,
Read-Only, DIR and SYS. It lets you label a disk and password
protect the label. To enable time stamping of files, you
must first run INITDIR to format the disk directory.
///2Label
Syntax:
SET {d:} [NAME=labelname.typ]
SET [PASSWORD=password]
SET [PASSWORD=<cr>
///3Examples
A>SET [NAME=DISK100]
Labels the disk on the default drive as DISK100.
A>SET [PASSWORD=SECRET]
Assigns SECRET to the disk label.
A>SET [PASSWORD=<cr>
Nullifies the existing password.
///2Passwords
SET [PROTECT=ON]
SET [PROTECT=OFF]
SET filespec [PASSWORD=password]
SET filespec [PROTECT=READ]
SET filespec [PROTECT=WRITE]
SET filespec [PROTECT=DELETE]
SET filespec [PROTECT=NONE]
SET filespec [attribute-options]
///3Modes
Password Protection Modes
Mode Protection
READ The password is required for reading, copying
writing, deleting or renaming the file.
WRITE The password is required for writing, deleting or
renaming the file. You do not need a password to
read the file.
DELETE The password is only required for deleting or
renaming the file. You do not need a password to
read or modify the file.
NONE No password exists for the file. If a password
password exists, this modifier can be used to
delete the password.
///2Attributes
RO sets the file attribute to Read-Only.
RW sets the file attribute to Read-Write.
SYS sets the file attribute to SYS.
DIR sets the file attribute to DIR.
ARCHIVE=OFF means that the file has not been backed up
(archived).
ARCHIVE=ON means that the file has been backed up (archived).
The Archive attribute can be turned on by SET or
by PIP when copying a group of files with the PIP
[A] option. SHOW and DIR display the Archive
option.
F1=ON|OFF turns on or off the user-definable file attribute
F1.
F2=ON|OFF turns on or off the user-definable file attribute
F2.
F3=ON|OFF turns on or off the user-definable file attribute
F3.
F4=ON|OFF turns on or off the user-definable file attribute
F4.
///3Examples
SET [PROTECT=ON]
Turns on password protection for all the files on the disk.
You must turn on password protection before you can assign
passwords to files.
SET [PROTECT=OFF]
Disables password protection for the files on your disk.
A>SET MYFILE.TEX [PASSWORD=MYFIL]
MYFIL is the password assigned to file MYFILE.TEX.
B>SET *.TEX [PASSWORD=SECRET, PROTECT=WRITE]
Assigns the password SECRET to all the TEX files on drive B.
Each TEX file is given a WRITE protect mode to prevent
unauthorized editing.
A>SET MYFILE.TEX [RO SYS]
Sets MYFILE.TEX to Read-Only and SYStem.
///2Default
A>SET [DEFAULT=dd]
Instructs the system to use dd as a password if you do not
enter a password for a password-protected file.
///2Time-Stamps
Syntax:
SET [CREATE=ON]
SET [ACCESS=ON]
SET [UPDATE=ON]
Explanation:
The above SET commands allow you to keep a record of the time
and date of file creation and update, or of the last access and
update of your files.
///3Options
[CREATE=ON] turns on CREATE time stamps on the disk in the
default or specified drive. To record the
creation time of a file, the CREATE option must be
turned on before the file is created.
[ACCESS=ON] turns on ACCESS time stamps on the disk in the
default or specified drive. ACCESS and CREATE
options are mutually exclusive; only one can be in
effect at a time. If you turn on the ACCESS time
stamp on a disk that previously had CREATE
time stamp, the CREATE time stamp is
automatically turned off.
[UPDATE=ON] turns on UPDATE time stamps on the disk in the
default or specified drive. UPDATE time stamps
record the time the file was last modified.
///3Examples
A>SET [ACCESS=ON]
A>SET [CREATE=ON,UPDATE=ON]
///2Drives
Syntax:
SET {d:} [RO]
SET {d:} [RW]
Example:
A>SET B: [RO]
Sets drive B to Read-Only.

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///1SETDEF
Syntax:
SETDEF { d: {,d: {,d: {,d:}}}} {[ TEMPORARY = d: ] |
[ ORDER = (typ {,typ}) ]}
SETDEF [DISPLAY | NODISPLAY]
SETDEF [PAGE | NOPAGE]
SETDEF [US | UK]
Explanation:
SETDEF allows the user to display or define up to four drives
for the program search order, the drive for temporary files, and
the file type search order. The SETDEF definitions affect
only the loading of programs and/or execution of SUBMIT
(SUB) files. SETDEF turns on/off the system Display and Console
Page modes. When on, the system displays the location and name
of programs loaded or SUBmit files executed, and stops after
displaying one full console screen of information. SETDEF also